A Brief History of the Regiment

The 30th Field Artillery was constituted during World War I on 5 July 1918, assigned to the 10th Division and organized at Camp Funston, Kansas (now a part of Fort Riley), along with the 28th Field Artillery and the 29th Field Artillery to form the 10th Field Artillery Brigade. The 30th had two battalions of three batteries, each battery consisting of four officers and 200 men and was armed primarily with the horse-drawn 4.7inch/120mm rifled guns. An epidemic of influenza delayed the division's training and caused several deaths within the Regiment. While an advanced party departed for Europe on October 27, 1918, before the rest of the Regiment could complete training and embark, the armistice ending World War I was signed and the 30th was demobilized on February 5, 1919.

World War II

The Regiment was reactivated at Camp Roberts, California on 4 June 1941 as part of the Regular Army. For a short time after Pearl Harbor and the commencement of US involvement in World War II, the unit's 155mm truck-drawn howitzers provided artillery defense for the California Coast. In May, 1942, both battalions were moved into positions guarding key harbor entrances on Kodiak Island and near Seward, Alaska. In July, 1943, the 1st Battalion was transported via ship to Adak Harbor, but two days later was rerouted several hundred miles away to Amchitka Island ready to help repel the Japanese from the Aleutians.
After nearly two years in Alaska, the Regiment was ordered to Seattle, transported cross-country to Camp Pickett, Virginia, and in May, 1944, redesignated the 30th Field Artillery Group. They departed for Europe in November, 1944. The 30th entered the European combat zone at Villers, France, in February, 1945, in support of a variety of infantry divisions. From then until the end of World War II in May, the Group was composed of five battalions equipped with everything from 4.5" guns to 155mm, 8", and 240mm howitzers and had numerous battalions temporarily attached to it. The unit fired over 1,900 fire missions as it moved steadily forward into Germany to a point near Neuberg along the Danube River. The 30th closed its World War II service as one of only six artillery units to have served in both the European and Pacific Theaters.
                      


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